cooking

Viewer Appreciation: Serial Princess

So after reaching my first 100 followers (which I am ecstatic about) I thought I would give a little shout out to those of you who made this goal a possibility!

With that being said, I plan on show casing one of my first followers, Serial Princess (aka Ayumi).

Serial Princess is a Blogger who writes about the hottest tech, fiercest sports, sleekest rides, and freshest recipes?

Yes, I said recipes. And damn, they are super scrumptious (looking)! Serial Princess brings a tomboy’s perspective on today’s cultural icons, products, and news. Princess balances her in-depth reviews with detail recipe instructions as well!

Recently she has begun to write product reviews for The Roosevelts,”Founded in 2012 to provide readers and brands we love a highbrow adventure for the brain featuring content that inspires, educates and entertains.“.

Please check out both Serial Princess at serialprincess.wordpress.com and here articles at the rsvlts.com

Shrimp Canapes

“Never close the door to learning”, my Nonna kept repeating while we were preparing the ingredients in the kitchen. We continue to work as we reminisce about the past.

Being first generation American, and youngest of six siblings, Anne Mondeau grew up in a nation where hard work was second nature. Born in 1928, Anne grew up at the tail end of the Great Depression and lived through the Second World War. Being raised in an large Italian family meant family came first and that every penny earned went towards helping the family. Many of her brothers would hustle newspapers in downtown Boston to make ends meet. However Teresa, Anne’s strict Italian mother, promoted the furthering of her children’s education. Many of her brothers and sister went on to be successful media public relation representatives, and some even served in the armed forces. Even though the economy was rough, Anne’s family found time to enjoy each other as well as good food. Today we will be partaking one of those delectable treats as we learn to cook Shrimp Canapes.

Shrimp Canapes

Recipe Instructions

What you will need:

  • 1 small onion finely chopped, finely chopped ½ of a green or red pepper, teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce, 1 to 2 drops of Tabasco, 2 teaspoons of garlic powder
  • Utensils that you may need are; chefs and paring knives, measuring spoons, mixing bowls, wooden mixing spoon, pasta pot, cutting board, and a food chopper (optional but recommended)

Rinsing Shrimp Peppers

Ingredient Preparation:

  • Before we can enjoy a tasty treat we must prepare all of our ingredients. First wash and de-shell the shrimp, and toss them into boiling water for three minutes (remember that about 36 shrimp makes 24 shells)
  • After the shrimp have become a nice bright pink, remove and strain. Now it is time to chop all the ingredients very finely

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Cooking Ingredients:

  • While the ingredients are being prepped, bring a pasta pot of water to a boil. Once the water has reached boiling point, toss a 1/8th    of a teaspoon of salt in the water immediately followed by 24-28 Conchiglioni Rigati shells. Cook for 13-15 minutes.
  •  After the shells have finished cooking (Al dente or firm not hard) strain and let shells cool till they are safe to handle.

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Mixing:

  • While the shells are cooling return to main ingredients (Tabasco, Worcestershire, mayonnaise, shrimp, onion, pepper, and garlic powder) mix all together in a separate bowl. Add mayonnaise to liking (one to two tablespoons for a dryer stuffing, or three to four for a creamier stuffing).

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Finalizing:

  • When the shells are cool enough to handle, begin stuffing shells with mixture. Do not be afraid to fill each shell to the brim. The more the better. Once all the shells are filled, chill for 15-20 minutes and serve!

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When my Nonna had told me about this recipe, she laughed and explained to me its origin. Once a year on Christmas eve, her family would have a feast. This feast was called the Feast of the Seven Fishes, La Vigilia (or Black Fast as my Nonna called it) is a traditional Italian Catholic practice. One particular Christmas Eve, my Nonna’s sister-in-law Helen Longo introduced this dish to the family. It became an instant classic and has been served every year since its introduction. Now you can partake in a little secret family recipe, and remember to never close the door to learning.