craft

Back to the Basics

Upon reflection, that is reflecting on my past work, I realized that I have been forgetting to focus on the most important part that make a good photo. So I have gone back to the basics, reading and studying composition, from different sources.

Some are from past greats (Bresson, Bourke-White, and Adams), and some are new professionals and writing books on composition techniques. Each time I look or read about great composition, it points back to simple ideals. A clear subject, and a strong contrast. Sure there is way more that goes into composing a masterful photo, but sometimes the most simple composition can compete with the greats.

So I have challenged myself to look at the mundane around the house and focus purely on composition techniques. Subjects that are prominent and don’t fade into the background (or foreground), clear and clean leading lines, and prominent framing.

Here are some of the results from my perusing around the house.

ImageImageImage

This was a challenge, but it forced me to stop, and consider my entire shot. It slowed me down and made me consider the surrounding elements (leading lines, focal planes, contrast, etc.) rather than just the subject. It was a wonderful experiment, and I learned some valuable skills for when I go out into the field to capture other wonderful moments.

It goes to show you that even the everyday household objects can create some interesting subject matter. So I challenge you to take out your camera (it doesn’t have to be any fancy dslr, just check out my other photo challenge) and start shooting away! You’ll be amazed at what you find!

P.S. if any of you found this interesting and would like to learn along side me as I explore composition techniques, or would like this to be a new subject, please vote on the poll! This allows me to get your opinion, and helps me know what interests you! Thanks again for the support and remember to stay creative!

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First Roll of Film with the New Analog SLR

Amazing Mistakes

Here are some of the first shots from my analog SLR (Konica).

I loved the outcome of these shots, since the built in light meter doesn’t work (I have been using the Light Meter app on my Ipod). With a few tweaks on the computer, these shots came out great. A few surprised me (seeing that they were a double exposure) but added to the feeling the photo provoked.

Classy

Digital Power Horse

flame on

Abstract imagery

Bokehlicious

Kickin Oldschool

classic

Introducing friends to photography

Denver

Coolest Shop Ever

Ill Style

Golden Bubbles

Old kettle

Coors has become a household name to many beer drinkers. Every football season, thousands of people are inundated with eye catching commercials. For many grabbing a cold one means, reaching in the fridge and pulling out a frosty Coors-light. The Silver Bullet is generally the first thing that pops into peoples heads when they hear the name Coors. Though many people associate Coors as a simply beer (mainly for barbeque’s, parties, and get-together’s) this is not entirely the case.

mmm beer

Coors has done an exceptional job in reaching across the nation, helping share some of Colorado’s crisp clean atmosphere. Now I know what many may be thinking (Coors cannot be compared to craft beer! That’s ludicrous, large production doesn’t generate unique flavors like micro-brewing does) , but that’s where living in state changes those facts. The Micro-brew scene has exploded in Colorado, thanks to many successful micro-brewers (New Belgium, Left-hand, Odells, and many others) has driven the creative front of small batch brewing.

Copper Madness 

Coors has felt the pressure of these smaller competitors and developed some tasty beers themselves. Blue Moon has become their forefront craft (Belgium Ale) style beer. With its creamy orange undertones, and its smooth light finish, the Coors Blue Moon has become successful in state and nation wide.

Frothy Friends

Though there beers have become more flavorful, the tour however is tasteless and bland. For the majority of the tour, you are forced down dimly lite pale corridors, informed only by a cheesy commentator via a plastic handled phone. Much of the brewing process is hidden behind doors, and is shown by pre-recorded video demonstrations. Towards the end of the trek, you are greeted by long lines in order to taste some of Coors finest selections. It definitely feels cold, and uninviting, lacking that warm cheery atmosphere of a local pub or hometown bar.

Lion Crest

Coors Brewery is a huge facility that produces large quantities of beer to quench the thirst of many a man or woman cross the country. Coors seems to be catching onto the growing movement of micro-brewing (rumor has it that a small batch of micro brewed beers will be hitting local Colorado bars and stores this spring/summer) and returning to its ancient roots. Beer should always be about the experience surrounding the consumption. A good beer not only tastes great, but evokes memories of happy times, and should always be shared with family and friends. Larger breweries such as Coors steer away from the art/craftsmanship of brewing. These breweries lose an essential ingredient to beer making, the lasting relationship between the Crafter and the Consumer.

BOKEH

I Heart Bokeh

I’m sure many photographers have heard of these wonderful out-of-focus balls before, but for many it is an illusive subject. Bokeh, according to Dictionary.com , is the”…out-of-focus areas photographic image”. The origin of the word comes from japan and not only describes the cute blurring balls in images, but it can also describe a person’s state of mind. Kai Wong of Digital Rev does a stellar job of not only explaining what bokeh is, but he goes in depth on how to create wonderful bokeh in one’s images. Check the video below to see Kai in action.

Grave Bokeh

The photos in this article that I have taken, are very simple examples of what one can do to manipulate the shape of bokeh. All it takes is some black construction paper, a pair of craft knives (exacto-blades), and creativity, and your on your way to “Bokehlicious” images.

Cross Bokeh

Have fun and please, don’t run with scissors (or blades). It will end badly.